Airsoft Shopping in Japan – Day 2

A couple less stores visited as I was short on time yesterday evening before the shops close up – though I did spend more time in each, perusing their selections of parts.

First, I attempted to find Mil-Freaks, only to discover that the address was not in fact a walk-in retail store (I later re-read the contact info on their website to discover that they are online business only). Mil-Freaks was of interest due to the producr line being mostly ACM, Flyye, Hong Kong brands and some US-made tactical gear; just the kind of stuff I’m usually shopping for when on my own free time. As with many of the locations I found with Google maps for the keywords “airsoft tokyo” for First Japan, this was a residential address as well from the looks of it.

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Air Borne Gun Shop was my next shopping stop. Though a little out of the beaten path, this has been my favourite shop so far for just pure selection of AEG parts – a plethora of stuff was just everywhere. The shopkeeper spoke limited English, but had enough technical vocabulary to help me find the correct hardness of hop up buckings that I was looking for. Unfortunately, I didn’t get his name or business card – but I definitely would recommend this shop to anyone in the Tokyo area looking for specific AEG stuff (lots of GBB parts too – Magna platform GBBR’s in particular). Some PTW parts, but more than I’ve seen at any of the other stores I visited (which had none) – and it was a pleasant surprise to hear the tech test firing one in the back (oh, how I’ve missed that sound). A whole corner was dedicated to real steel parts, including a number of optics from the likes of Aimpoint and Night Force (and at 2x the price of what I can get those for at home). I do wish I had gotten a PDI 05 barrel while I was there… they had each of the common lengths I was looking for in-stock, and at the best prices I’ve seen so far. An Orga widebore wouldn’t have hurt at the prices there either – much less than any price I’ve seen outside of Japan. However, the location is not on the JR train line I had gotten familiar with, so getting back there would have taken longer than I had time for in Tokyo.

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Echigoya (their newer Shinjuku location) was last on my list. Not all the sales floor staff were super knowledgeable, nor was the level of spoken English as great as I had hoped for from a chain of Airsoft stores, but the variety of all things survival game related was second to none here – about the same number of categories of stuff as some of the bigger North American stores. Techs here also had limited English, but when I started asking questions about installing Flat Hop mods and the associated parts, they definitely perked up beyond what I observed from their interactions with previous local customers before me.

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